CERT
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Information for Editors
To have a new guideline automatically listed above be sure to label it err and recommendation.

Risk Assessment Summary

Rule

Severity

Likelihood

Remediation Cost

Priority

Level

ERR00-CPP

medium

probable

high

P4

L3

ERR01-CPP

low

probable

low

P6

L2

ERR02-CPP

low

unlikely

high

P1

L3

ERR03-CPP

low

unlikely

medium

P2

L3

ERR04-CPP

medium

probable

high

P4

L3

ERR05-CPP

medium

probable

high

P4

L3

ERR06-CPP

medium

unlikely

medium

P4

L3

ERR07-CPP

low

probable

high

P2

L3

ERR08-CPP

low

probable

medium

P4

L3

ERR09-CPP

low

unlikely

medium

P2

L3

ERR10-CPP

high

likely

medium

P18

L1

ERR11-CPP

medium

likely

high

P6

L2

ERR12-CPP

medium

probable

high

P4

L3

ERR13-CPP

low

unlikely

medium

P2

L3

 


2 Comments

  1. Given that C++ provides exceptions, can we make any stronger claims wrt errno?

    1. errno is still useful in C++, although the System Error C++ 1x facility extends C++ support for errno values well beyond the values required by C++ 2003: EDOM, EILSEQ, and ERANGE. In C++ 1x, most (all?) POSIX errno values are valid, although they are exposed as rather verbose enumerators of the std::errc type. For example, the C++ 1x constant that corresponds to ENOTTY is std::errc::inappropriate_io_control_operation.